Tagged Johnny Oversteer

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A Long Time Coming – Triumph Vitesse

With their rarity today, it’s hard to remember how successful the Triumph Herald was in its day. Introduced in 1959 to replace the large unloved – and unsuccessful – Standard Eight and Ten, the new small car made good use of the modern lines penned by Giovanni Michelotti to create an entirely more desirable vehicle….

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Men in Sheds – Moss Motor Company

There was – and is – no connection between the Moss Motor Company and Moss Motors except for a common appreciation for sports cars. John Cowperthwaite built his first special on an Austin 7 chassis when he was 18 and then decided to build a series of kits for commercial production. During the height of…

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Tiny Tart – Nash Metropolitan

The first captive import to be sold in the United States, the Nash Metropolitan was also one of the first subcompact cars to enter production in the American marketplace. Designed in the United States by William Flajole, the small car was intended to serve as cheap transportation for the increasing number of multi-car families and…

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Top This – MGB Bermuda Hardtop

Most enthusiasts, no matter their mettle, appreciate a good hardtop and the MGB Bermuda Hardtop is no exception. When our British sports cars were sold new there was an entire industry built around developing and marketing accessories for their customization. As expected, products for the MGB were profligate and several companies were formed to take…

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A Prized Failure – Morgan Plus 4 Plus

It’s hard to comprehend – given the continued viability of Morgan even today in the 21st Century – but 50 years ago, the venerable firm at Malvern Link was ridiculed for the old-fashioned nature of their signature car. With a front suspension that was patented long before the Titanic was launched and styling that even…

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Cars & Coffee – Adrian Mitu

When Adrian Mitu was an architecture student in Bucharest, Romania, he would often spend his idle moments lost in thought contemplating vintage and classic cars. After graduation in 2013, he decided to forego his chosen discipline and enter the world of automotive design. A fan of former BMW designer Chris Bangle – the creator of…

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Profile – 1948 Healey Duncan

The Donald Healey Motor Company completed its first car immediately following the end of World War II and series production began with the Elliott saloon and Westland roadster in 1946. Both models were powered by the 2.4-liter Riley engine and featured a trailing arm independent suspension designed by Healey. In addition to the Elliott and…

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Driven – 1968 Triumph TR250

Despite the success of the Triumph TR4 and TR4A in sales and competition, as the end of the 60s approached it was clear that the company had to improve its performance with the introduction of a new engine that could offer not only greater horsepower, but also smoother operation than the relatively rough and noisy…

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Driven – 1965 Jaguar E-Type OTS

The 1950s were halcyon days for Jaguar. With postwar demand for sports cars reaching record levels, Jaguar’s iconic XK120 two-seater quickly became a must-have amongst the American and European “sporty” car set. Alongside success in the showrooms, the decade also marked a period of near total domination by Jaguar in endurance racing, including 24 Hours…

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